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Vincent Iannelli, M.D.

Skippy Peanut Butter Recall

By March 4, 2011

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Skippy Peanut Butter Recall - Photo courtesy of FDAUnilever and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have announced a limited recall of Skippy Reduced Fat Peanut Butter because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Fortunately, unlike previous peanut butter recalls, this peanut butter recall only includes a few products. Specifically, this limited recall only affects Skippy Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread and Skippy Reduced Fat Super Chunk Peanut Butter Spread sold in 16.3 oz plastic jars with:

  • UPCs: 048001006812 and 048001006782
  • Best-If-Used-By Dates: MAY1612LR1, MAY1712LR1, MAY1812LR1, MAY1912LR1, MAY2012LR1 and MAY2112LR1

The UPC number is located on the side of the jar's label below the bar code and the Best-If-Used-By Date is stamped on the lid of the jar. The recalled Skippy peanut butter was sold in Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.

Although no illnesses have been reported from the contaminated peanut butter, consumers should discard recalled peanut butter and get a replacement coupon from Unilever if they have Skippy Reduced Fat Peanut Butter Spread with the above UPCs and Best-If-Used-By-Dates.

Related:
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook
FDA Skippy Peanut Butter Recall Alert
Salmonella Symptoms
Salmonella Outbreaks
Salmonella and Food Poisoning

Comments
March 5, 2011 at 8:57 am
(1) Rebecca says:

The upc # is the same, but the dates are different, is this on the recall?

March 5, 2011 at 9:12 am
(2) Vincent Iannelli, MD says:

“The upc # is the same, but the dates are different, is this on the recall?”

The recall states that ‘Consumers who have purchased Skippy Reduced Fat Peanut Butter Spread with the above UPCs and Best-If-Used-By-Dates are urged to discard the product immediately and call the company for a replacement coupon.’

That makes it sound like you should have one of each number matching to be on the recall. I would think it would have said ‘with the above UPCs or Best-If-Used-By-Dates’ if it was one or the other number.

The UPC number probably just tells you which type of peanut butter it is:

048001006812 = Skippy Peanut Butter, Reduced Fat Creamy, 16.3-Ounce Jars

048001006782 = Skippy Peanut Butter, Reduced Fat Super Chunk, 16.3-Ounce Jars

So it is likely the Best-If-Used-By-Dates that identifies the recalled peanut butter within each type. If you still aren’t sure, contact the Skippy customer service rep.

March 6, 2011 at 8:08 pm
(3) Charley Duffy says:

Why aren’t they more clear about this, it is sooo obvious that the information given is confusing – I don’t know which is worse, their error in making the product or their ineptitude in clearly identifying the true bad jars…..I am getting two new ones based singularly on the UPC code, I won’t take a chance and they were inept in being clear. I also can’t believe, during a recall, that some are so into themselves that they start explaining and describing the peanut butter they eat – foolish and sooo self serving.

March 8, 2011 at 9:25 am
(4) Katie says:

The new jars you will buy will have the same UPC codes as the recalled ones. The UPC code indicate the type of penut butter, so no matter what if you buy the reduced fat penut butter from skippy, it will always have that UPC code. The recall is only for the reduced fat jars with the use by dates listed.

March 5, 2011 at 10:15 am
(5) Leslie says:

I only eat Krema peanut butter. ..the ONLY ingredient is peanuts. …no oils, preservatives and doesn’t need refrigeration. Never been recalled. ….

March 5, 2011 at 5:52 pm
(6) Vincent Iannelli, MD says:

“I only eat Krema peanut butter. ..the ONLY ingredient is peanuts. …no oils, preservatives and doesn’t need refrigeration. Never been recalled. ….”

Most peanut butter (check the label) can be stored at room temperature, even after it is opened.

Krema sounds great, but the fact that it is only made with roasted peanuts and hasn’t been recalled in the past doesn’t necessarily mean it is any safer than other brands of peanut butter.

As we have seen in other recent, past, and current recalls, many very natural and unprocessed foods can be contaminated with bacteria. The current recall linked to the E. coli outbreak is thought to be due to hazelnuts.

Not hazelnuts mixed with sugar or processed and preserved hazelnuts, but just plain old hazelnuts.

Past E. coli outbreaks have been from fresh spinach and Salmonella outbreaks have been linked to pistachios and Alfalfa Sprouts.

March 6, 2011 at 8:32 pm
(7) Rilo says:

Skippy bragged about never being recalled a few years backed (2009) when Peter Pan had that trouble with an outbreak. It’s even bragged about on their Wikipedia page.

I guess now Skippy Peanut Butter will have their Wiki page updated to show a Salmonella.

And I guess it’s now time for me to switch peanut butter brand. After 2009′s outbreak I switched from Peter Pan to Skippy. Now, I guess I will either go with JIF or an safer organic brand.

I get picky about my food choices after these outbreaks because I experienced major sickness during the E. coli during the bagged spinach salad drama. It was the worst sickness that I ever experienced, I missed tons of work, lose healthy weight, and missed two months of my life because of that outbreak.

Major law enforcement should be brought in to deal with some of these companies that push out dangerous foods to many states.

If I owned a cake shop and made 4 people sick with E.coli, I would be out of business and in major trouble with the state I lived in. But these major corporations can make hundreds (if not thousands) of people sick with their outbreaks and receive any penalties. They have Wall Street backing them unlike the small business cake shop owners.

Thanks for your update Vincent.

March 6, 2011 at 9:07 pm
(8) M A Ryan says:

I have a jar that has the code in question but I do not see the date stamped on this jar anywhere. I also live in Maryland. Do we need to be concerned about this jar?

Thank you

March 6, 2011 at 9:59 pm
(9) Vincent Iannelli, MD says:

“I have a jar that has the code in question but I do not see the date stamped on this jar anywhere. I also live in Maryland. Do we need to be concerned about this jar?”

The Best-If-Used-By Date should be stamped on the lid of the jar.

If you can’t confirm that the jar is not part of the recall by finding a Best-If-Used-By Date that is not on the recall list, then I would not assume that it is safe. You might call the company or return it to where you bought it and ask them.

March 7, 2011 at 9:21 am
(10) Craig says:

You need reading glasses and VERY good lighting to find the used by and UPC codes. They are stamped on the dark blue lid in dark black ink. Thanks again Skippy!!

March 7, 2011 at 6:37 pm
(11) Shannon says:

It is absolutely RIDICULOUS that there are food recalls on a regular basis! It is even worse when the recall involves a food that is often a favorite of children. Seriously, we can’t count on the fact that we are giving our children food that will not make them sick? What a disappointment! I wonder what the next recall will be???????????????

March 7, 2011 at 7:09 pm
(12) Vincent Iannelli, MD says:

“Seriously, we can’t count on the fact that we are giving our children food that will not make them sick?”

To be fair, there is no evidence that the recalled Skippy peanut butter actually made anyone sick. According to the FDA, ‘The recall was initiated as the result of a routine sampling program by the company, which revealed that these finished products may contain the bacteria.’

Unlike some other food recalls, it was not prompted by an outbreak that was later traced back to a food because a lot of people got sick.

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