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National Infant Immunization Week

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Updated April 24, 2013

National Infant Immunization Week 2013

National Infant Immunization Week 2013

Photo courtesy of the CDC

National Infant Immunization Week 2013:

National Infant Immunization Week 2013 will be observed from April 20 to April 27.

Like last year, National Infant Immunization Week will overlap the World Health Organization's second annual World Immunization Week and the Pan American Health Organization's Vaccination Week in the Americas. It is the 19th annual National Infant Immunization Week.

National Infant Immunization Week:

National Infant Immunization Week is an annual observance to highlight the importance of immunizations that protect children against 14 vaccine-preventable diseases.

Since 1994, when the first National Infant Immunization Week was observed, it provides local and state health departments, health care professionals, community leaders, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to highlight the benefits of immunizations and risks and dangers of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles and pertussis.

During National Infant Immunization Week, other key messages you might learn about include that:

  • Vaccinated individuals help protect entire communities by preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases, which is especially important for children who are too young too be vaccinated, have an immune system problem and can't be vaccinated, or are on chemotherapy and their vaccines may not be working, etc.
  • Vaccine-preventable diseases still circulate in the United States (as highlighted by recent outbreaks of measles and pertussis in the US) and around the world, so continued vaccination is necessary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks.
  • Immunizations can save your child’s life.
  • Vaccination is very safe and effective.

National Infant Immunization Week is also a great time to make sure your child's vaccines are up-to-date.

Some great resources, including resources for parents who need a catch-up immunization schedule because their kids are a little behind on their shots, vaccine-hesitant parents, and anyone who wants to learn more about the importance of vaccines include:

Also read about the discredited theory that tried to link vaccines with autism. Although still promoted by many anti-vaccine folks, parents are often surprised that there are plenty of parents of children with autism who do not believe that vaccines were the cause.

Last year's National Infant Immunization Week included activities such as the:

  • Mobile Childhood Vaccine Project in Wasilla, Alaska
  • Vaccination Station in Flagstaff, Arizona
  • Cocooning Awareness campaign in Parker, Arizona
  • SOUP! (Shots Offer Unrivaled Protection) soup-tasting event in Denver, Colorado
  • Shots for Tots Health Fair in Alexandria, Louisiana
  • Faces of Vaccine-Preventable Disease event in Minneapolis and St. Cloud, Minnesota
  • Lecture with Seth Mnookin, author of "The Panic Virus" in Reno, Nevada
  • Morning Out for Mom and Me program in Indian Lake, New York
  • Immunization Art Project in Urbana, Ohio
  • Hoops for Health tournament in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Texas Vaccine for Children Conference in Laredo, Texas
  • Teddy Bear Clinic in Appomattox, Virginia

What will you do for this year's National Infant Immunization Week?

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